WEEKLY UPDATE JAN 31 2015

Can you believe the weekend is here?  We have some exciting things going on. Not to mention a confused website and Facebook posting about us.  We are not attorneys and you to consult your attorney for legal issues.  We want to make sure people are not misled.  I am not saying those websites or Facebook posts are competing with us, we don’t mind people doing their own activism and we are not saying those sites are not positive, you must decide who you follow click here.   Although it is wise to follow some legal advice, whoever you choose as your legal advisor.

For any of the Spanish Land Grant Heirs or the Hispanic population, please read our news and information section to stay updated.  Here is a recap of what happened this week.

We published :
Events coming up:

Check with your attorney about upcoming events going on.  A rally for her clients, please see her website

03/04/2015 Primary elections

Causes:
  • Petition
  • Election campaigning
  • Unity campaign

 

 

hb724 commission exposed THE UNCREDIBILITY OF THEIR ANALYSIS PART 1

As we promised, in this series, we will begin to expose the THE UN-CREDIBILITY OF the hb274 commissions ANALYSIS and final report.  You will definitely want to read this and give this to your family members.

At first you might want to read the exact law regarding the duties of the commission, as published on Jan 7, 2015 click here.

When the report first came out we published an article “Don’t give up hope, have faith! – The commission report was scripted, and untrue – ambiguous”

am·big·u·ous
amˈbiɡyo͞oəs/
adjective
  1. (of language) open to more than one interpretation; having a double meaning.
    “the question is rather ambiguous”
    • unclear or inexact because a choice between alternatives has not been made.
      “this whole society is morally ambiguous”
      synonyms: equivocal, ambivalent, open to debate/argument, arguable, debatable;More

First of all it is enormously important that you realize the commissions report is ambiguous, and untrue. If you have not read the report you can get it by clicking here.

When a law or a bill or legal term is ambiguous (open to more than one interpretation) then this can be challenged legally.  Mr. Lance Bruun the Unclaimed mineral rights commission chairman has made HB724 ambiguous and his report is extremely ambiguous.  His interpretation on the bill and of the laws are false!  It is important to note that the supreme court overrules his statements, as you read the recent commissions final report.

If you were active in attending or viewing the commission meetings you will immediately noticing many things that are untrue, as when Mr. Brunn reports nothing was presented to the commission about the unclaimed minerals.

Secondly it is important to not that the report was scripted.  When you view the first meetings of the commission, they are primarily focused on getting the report done.  The proof of this is that in June, they already had the report draft finished as we obtained all of the discovery (click here to download) from the commission, to protect the Spanish Land Grant Heirs.

False claim #1

Mr. Bruun claims on page 3-4 of the report that “No unclaimed and presumed abandoned mineral proceeds that were not reported to the Comptroller are involved; however, much testimony was heard on the existence of such
claims and issues that are not the authority of the Commission.”  

This is untrue because as mandated by law the commission were supposed to study funds that might include proceeds owned by a descendant of the original South Texas land grants.

He calls those not the authority of the commission to investigate?  He was to investigate all claims, for him to impostor a supreme court judge and assert this is illegal.  He is trying to cover up the existing unclaimed and abandoned mineral proceeds.

When the commission chairman says no one presented possible claims, again, this is untrue.  Note our video obtained of the Oct 2014 meeting where he asserts there are unclaimed wells, and other commission members want to know about them.  Click here to view the video or click here for the audio.

False claim #2

The chairman of the commission re-writes the hb724 and makes some new requirements that are clearly not part of their objectives by law.  This is an error and false claim!

He states on ISSUE #1 that it was the job of of the commission to “Before any other findings could be established, there were preliminary issues of the law that confronted the Commission: 1) How is ownership of a descendant established; and 2) How is a mineral or royalty interest established?”

False claim #3

House Bill 724  States  “Recommendations for efficient and effective procedures under which the state may be required to: determine the owners of the proceeds; notify the owners of the proceeds; and distribute the proceeds to the owners.” , and then attempts to assert the not one “descendant made proof of ownership of identifiable material.”

This is untrue click here to download all of the submissions given to the commission including proof of ownership and identifiable material, from courts and from the Texas railroad commission.

False claim #4

The commission makes their own interpretation of the law, which was not part of the commission duties.  They state “When a person sells a piece of land and no mention is made of the minerals contained, the rights pass on to the purchaser. The reservations of minerals must be made by clear language and the courts do not favor reservations by implication.10 Burton, Ramos & Rangel memorandum and UMPC Report 7-13.”

“The Commission finds: That the major misstatement of Texas Law by an attorney for many of the claimants has contributed to the wrongful application of the law, and may have led to the creation of this Commission.9 Utilizing several scholarly papers, the Commission determined that the settled law in Texas is as follows: When a person sells a piece of land and no mention is made of the minerals contained, the rights pass on to the purchaser. The reservations of minerals must be made by clear language and the courts do not favor reservations by implication.10  In doing so, members emphasize that the following statement is untrue: “Normally under Texas property law…..in the case of land grants, if no mention is made of the mineral or the transference of the mineral by sale or conveyance of the land, the minerals are retained by the seller and pass to his or her heirs.”11”  

“The Commission finds: There is no authority that the 1866 Amendment released minerals to all previous owners of the soil or to anyone other than the owner of the soil as of the date of the 1866 Amendment. Further, the result is that the State of Texas can enact laws that reserve minerals from any conveyance of public lands, provided nothing will impair vested rights from the reservation.” 

But the commission is clearly in error here and their assumptions are untrue. The supreme court of Texas protects our royalities.   Please read this http://thevoiceofchange.info/mineral-rights-explained-texas-constitution-1866-1876-affirmed-supreme-court/ which affirms that after 1866 , came 1876 Texas Constitutional Amendment which affirmed ” the landowner was given complete ownership of the minerals in all the lands that passed from the sovereign before the effective date of the Constitution of 1876.” Later in 1928 the Texas Supreme Court held that the “act did not relinquish the oil and gas rights to the landowners, but made the landowners the agent of the Sate for the leasing of oil and gas rights and granted to the landowner the right to one half of all bonuses, royalties and other benefits accruing from those leases. ” 

Point being as an heir, of a deceased descendant of the landowner, still does have rights to “half of all bonuses, royalties and other benefits accruing from those leases”  (Do you hear them talking about half? or about the bonuses or other benefits? NO, because they are hiding those things, they are talking about some small percentage of royalties.  We must know the truth!

We have only taken apart the first couple pages of the report, but we will add more material soon, as we are working on this series.

We hope to provide a scripted document letter that you can use to send to the Governor and Attorney General and other representatives in rebuttal to this report, asking for their help. Also if you have not signed the petition, this is our next step we need thousands of supporters.  You can see that attorneys appointed by Gov. Perry, who work for the big oil companies, clearly have the oil companies in interest and not the Spanish land grant heirs.

You decide – how we differ – Let us stand with a greater determination

an exert from John Valdez article (read here)

by Michael  Epstein

If you haven’t read the latest, then please pray for our team and all of the heirs.  As a legal advisor, and team member I wanted to make my own post about how are differ using experts from John’s posting.

Let us rise up tonight with a greater readiness. Let us stand with a greater determination. And let us move on in these powerful days, these days of challenge to make America what it ought to be. We have an opportunity to make America a better nation. – Dr. Martin Luther King

Here is how we are different:

  • we are accountable every quarter with our financial statement and where the money goes to
  • we are not here to make money it costs us $1,050 a month or more to maintain the network, we make on average $35 / month in donations + registrations
  • we have no hidden fees 99% of our members are free members, unless you want to become a pro member and really get active, for $20.00 a year , this three times lower in cost, and it enables us to stay active and get the members involved, or if you want to support the network to help us maintain the website, or get free downloads, private member access etc.
  • we allow members to get involved with our causes and their own projects,
  • we are not worried about competition, we want people to get active and use their voice, if you have an idea, do it, start it – if you want, we can help you promote it
  • we have multiple campaigns and causes going on all the time and more to come
  • we give you daily news and updates
  • we allow users to make comments on our multiple social networks and website,
  • we are not afraid of allowing people to express themselves and or addressing issues
  • we don’t intimidate or threat people who want to do their own projects, if you have been threaded or removed from a group or a professional service, please contact me, I would be happy to let you know your legal rights and guide you
  • we do not slander or falsely accuse members or heirs
  • we are the only network promoting unity among all of the heirs
  • we have a growing team of professionals, legal, journalists, business, marketing and media
  • we have a network full of vast resources

We are not misleading – we are not here to mislead anyone!  All of our information is found through the same information that legal professionals get their information. For example, the Texas railroad commission, historians, and other trusted sources, and any of our posts were published to clear things up, are thoroughly consulted with experts

You must decide (who is on your side): We did read some of the information our (family of descendants and supporters ) are posting, and that is true you must decide who you want to follow.

No mis truths here: As far as mis-truths, there are many of those being represented on the internet by other sites.  Only God will judge the people who continue to lie about things.  We are here to promote the truth.

” Survival demands that we grapple with problems – Martin Luther King .. And also in the human rights revolution, if something isn’t done, and in a hurry, to bring the ..peoples of the world out of their long years of poverty, their long years of hurt and neglect, the whole world is doomed. Now, I’m just happy that God has allowed me to live in this period, to see what is unfolding. …Now, what does all of this mean in this great period of history? It means that we’ve got to stay together. We’ve got to stay together and maintain unity. “

I would also personally like to thank those people who are supporting us in any way they can possible, this will only help our causes to go forward.

I have invested my own personal money in this project and take things personally when anyone attacks a member of this network or the heirs.  I share the views as my colleagues.

Michael  Epstein is an legal advisor for the Media. His works in litigation in intellectual property, dispositions, technology, licensing, joint ventures, agreements to the media.

HEIRS – our financial and accountability report

by John Valdez

We’ve got to stay together and maintain unity and we see that there is some confusion out there among the heirs and descendants and other networks.   Let us rise up tonight with a greater readiness. Let us stand with a greater determination. And let us move on in these powerful days, these days of challenge to make America what it ought to be. We have an opportunity to make America a better nation. And I want to thank God, once more, for allowing me to be here with you.

Our Income statement: 11/15/2014-1/27/2015  We want to give you an update on our income, for those who have supported us; To date we have received a whopping $66.00 from Paid Members and $25 in donations  from supporters to continue this network (besides that of our own staff members).   We are not out to make money, only to help this network to continue and to fund future causes.  We have free members who join and other members who are following us and actively promoting unity and getting involved in our causes.   I would personally like to thank those people who are supporting us in any way they can possible, this will only help our causes to go forward.

Our Costs:


  • $50.00 per month for our high level of internet hosting for our website
  • $500.00 per month we pay a website firm to maintain the site and social networks and support bugs
  • $500.00 per month for SEO (Search Engine Optimization)
  • $1.00-$5.00 per download file for the secure download service.
  • $25.00 per year for the domain

 = $ 1050.00 per month to maintain the website

not including downloads and domain registrations, or high level support issues

As you can see we are not making any money, we (the founders and staff members) are pumping money into the project until it will maintain itself. The founders have invested over $13,000.00 to start up this project, out of their own wallets.

We are not compensating ourselves: We as a team, have contributed much money to get this project started, out of our own personal expenses. We are not here to make money as you can see without our own staff, this site would not be active. The monies we receive are maintained in a separate account for the sole purpose of keeping the network internet hosting active, and extra money go towards funding the causes and making this network (website) better. If we ever get an excess then would would invest that money into litigation and efforts for the Spanish Land Grant Heirs.

Our friends are people who have found us through social media and through others who have invited them.  We have not made one campaign asking friends of other networks to join our network.  We also have a skilled team of professionals working to keep his network strong.

We are non-competitive:  We are not in competition to any other persons website or projects, and we don’t know why people think we are. Maybe because we are rapidly growing with decedents and Spanish land grant heirs that want to unite, and want to make a difference ?    If we were in competition with another persons website it would be obvious and we would not invite our members, followers to check with their attorney, or to donate money to their attorney’s litigation, or get their group information from their attorney. We would not encourage them to start their own causes and make a voice for change.  If you will search our site we have repeatedly said WE ARE NOT ATTORNEY’s.

here is how we are different:

  • we are accountable every quarter with our financial statement and where the money goes to
  • we are not here to make money it costs us $1,050 a month or more to maintain the network, we make on average $35 / month in donations + registrations
  • we have no hidden fees 99% of our members are free members, unless you want to become a pro member and really get active, for $20.00 a year , this three times lower in cost, and it enables us to stay active and get the members involved, or if you want to support the network to help us maintain the website
  • we allow members to get involved with our causes and their own projects,
  • we are not worried about competition, we want people to get active and use their voice, if you have an idea, do it, start it – if you want, we can help you promote it
  • we have multiple campaigns and causes going on all the time and more to come
  • we give you daily news and updates
  • we allow users to make comments on our multiple social networks and website,
  • we are not afraid of allowing people to express themselves and or addressing issues
  • we don’t intimidate or threat people who want to do their own projects
  • we do not slander or falsely accuse members or heirs
  • we are the only network promoting unity among all of the heirs
  • we have a growing team of professionals, legal, journalists, business, marketing and media
  • we have a network full of vast resources

We are not misleading – we are not here to mislead anyone!  All of our information is found through the same information that legal professionals get their information. For example, the Texas railroad commission, historians, and other trusted sources, and any of our posts were published to clear things up, are thoroughly consulted with experts.

You must decide (who is on your side): We did read some of the information our (family of descendants and supporters ) are posting, and that is true you must decide who you want to follow.

No mis truths here: As far as mis-truths, there are many of those being represented on the internet by other sites.  Only God will judge the people who continue to lie about things.  We are here to promote the truth.

Who are we affiliated with?  Only those people and organizations that you will find on our website who have asked us to publish information about them and for them.

Here is some quotes from Dr. Martin Luther King

” Survival demands that we grapple with problems – Martin Luther King .. And also in the human rights revolution, if something isn’t done, and in a hurry, to bring the ..peoples of the world out of their long years of poverty, their long years of hurt and neglect, the whole world is doomed. Now, I’m just happy that God has allowed me to live in this period, to see what is unfolding. …Now, what does all of this mean in this great period of history? It means that we’ve got to stay together. We’ve got to stay together and maintain unity. ”

Let us rise up tonight with a greater readiness. Let us stand with a greater determination. And let us move on in these powerful days, these days of challenge to make America what it ought to be. We have an opportunity to make America a better nation. And I want to thank God, once more, for allowing me to be here with you.

How 10 Minutes of Work a Day Can Maximize Our / Your Productivity

Everyone can spare 10 minutes a day. Here’s how to leverage those 10 minutes to maximize our and your productivity over the long run while reducing stress.

 

Ten minutes doesn’t seem like much time, right? The standard workday in the United States is eight hours, which is 480 minutes, and many of us work something closer to 600 a day. Compared to 600, 10 minutes seems like nothing, but if used properly and consistently, those 10 minutes can make a substantial difference in your productivity.

If you’re struggling with executing a large project, or if you’ve been postponing a certain task because you just can’t fit it into your schedule, or if you’re just interested in improving your skillset but you don’t know how or where to start, consider taking 10 minutes a day to see your goals through.

The Theory

The theory behind the “10 minutes a day” approach is based on the fact that even the busiest CEOs of the world can usually manage to set aside 10 minutes for something small. Over the course of days or weeks, as long as that 10 minutes is executed successfully and consistently, the end result will be completion of your designated task. It’s like setting aside a dollar every day in savings–you probably won’t miss the dollar, but at the end of the year you’d have a $365 windfall.

In this case, 10 minutes a day adds up to nearly an hour for every workweek. That’s an hour of newly found time that you can spend however you choose, assuming, of course, that you’re diligent with your daily practice. Over the course of a year, that’s more than 50 hours of work; more than an entire workweek of additional time.

The potential applications for this are limitless, but there are some fundamentals worth considering.

Ten-Minute Projects

Let’s say you have a gigantic, looming project due in a few weeks or months, and you have no idea how you’re going to fit it in. It’s going to take hours of planning, hours of research, and even more hours of work to get everything done, and you can’t bring yourself to start it because you know it’s going to consume your life.

In this case, 10 minutes a day may not seem like enough–and if you’re dealing with a tight deadline, you might need additional help–but that extra hour a week could be just what you need to get a jumpstart on things.

During your first 10 minutes, break down the project into several phases, and then break each phase down into sub-phases. Then, break those sub-phases down into manageable tasks, and start listing the tasks in the order that they’ll need to be accomplished, 10 minutes at a time. Then, set a task aside for each day–before you know it, you’ll be deep into your project, and you might just build enough momentum to tackle it during the remainder of your workday.

Ten-Minute Tasks

It’s also possible that there’s a task (or series of tasks) that you must perform regularly, but it always seems to elude you. For example, if you take responsibility for checking your company blog for comments on a weekly basis, analyzing web visitor traffic, and posting something new on social media every day, you can consolidate these micro-tasks into one daily 10-minute session.

Doing so will not only help you remember to execute these tasks on a regular basis, it could also save you time. Instead of suddenly remembering one of these tasks in the middle of a larger project and derailing your momentum, you’ll already have the time set aside to deal with them. You can do this with almost any regularly executed task, though some may require sessions longer than 10 minutes.

Ten-Minute Reading

If you don’t have any standing tasks or projects you’re having trouble accomplishing, you can always spend 10 minutes a day to simply improve yourself. Start setting aside lectures or reading materials that interest you, and build up a queue for your consumption. All you’ll need to do is spend 10 minutes a day plugging through your material–reading a new chapter or breaking into a new lecture–and by the end of the year, you’ll have gained more than 50 hours’ worth of information. This is especially useful for overwhelmed employees; since most materials are available in an audio format, this 10 minutes can even be accomplished during a commute.

Ten-Minute Exercise

Of course, 10 minutes of break time could lead to just as much a productivity increase as 10 minutes of more work. Studies show that as little as five minutes of exercise a day can be beneficial in reducing stress and adding years to your lifespan, but 10 minutes is even better. Spend 10 minutes a day walking briskly outside the office or climbing the stairs to your floor, and you’ll gain the stress-relieving, productivity-enhancing benefits.

How to Find Those Ten Minutes

No matter how busy you are, it’s possible to find 10 minutes to execute your daily task. If you don’t believe that, you probably haven’t tried rearranging things in a way that allows those 10 minutes to come to fruition.

First, try chunking your time. It’s a bit of a tedious, mathematical process, but it can open up time slots you didn’t even know you had. As an example, if you work for 10 hours a day, break that time up into smaller chunks and designate those chunks for specific tasks or groups of tasks. You could spend an hour drafting paperwork, an hour running a web traffic analysis, two hours throughout the day checking and responding to emails, and so on. Use alarms or reminders to keep yourself on schedule and on task. Then, all you’ll need to do is shorten one of those periods of time by 10 minutes–that leftover period is now yours to do with as you see fit.

Second, try eliminating all your distractions–that includes work-related distractions as well. Turn off your phone, shut down your computer, and isolate yourself as much as you can for as long as you can. Start spending at least one hour a day working this way, and you’ll likely start to notice that hour becoming more and more productive. Eventually, you’ll save enough time that you can squeeze 10 minutes in at the end.

Alternatively, you can fit your 10 minutes a day into another previously occupied stretch of time. For example, you could spend 10 minutes working on a task while eating breakfast, or substitute 10 minutes of work for 10 minutes of reading the newspaper. If your 10 minutes of tasks include listening to an audiobook or brainstorming, you can even execute your 10 minutes a day as part of your daily commute.

The bottom line here is that anyone can find 10 minutes a day to work on a given project, and if you have 10 minutes a day to spend, you can eventually tackle any project. Keep this in mind the next time you encounter a project, a task, or a goal that you think is insurmountable, and try using this strategy to overcome it. With practice, it will get easier, and eventually you’ll have total mastery over your own productivity.

 

BY JAYSON DEMERS

Founder and CEO, AudienceBloom

South Texas Spanish Land Grants: Unnumbered Porciones


 south Texas Spanish land grants


Spanish and Mexican Land Grants of South Texas

Unnumbered Porciones

Please note this list is from 2002, and not updated, but we are looking for a more updated list.

 

ARISPE, MARIANO Santa Maria de los Angeles de Arriba
Webb, Duval Counties at 22140, 9448 acres respectively
Granted: 1835

BALLI CABAZOS, JUAN ANTONIO El Paistle
Kenedy County at 25790 acres
Granted: 1834
Assignees: Cabazos, Jorge, Kenedy, Mifflin (1866)

BALLI, JOSE FRANCISCO La Barreta
Kenedy County at 124297 acres
Granted: 1804

BALLI, JOSE NICOLAS AND JUAN JOSE Padre Island
Kenedy, Kleberg, Cameron, Willacy, Nueces Counties at 19927, 13285, 7971, 7528, 2214 acres respectively
Granted: 1829

BALLI, JUAN JOSE San Salvador del Tule
Hidalgo, Brooks, Kennedy, Willacy Counties at 315391, 21768, 71955, 9358 acres respectively
Granted: 1797
Ranches: 1. Meladas 2. Sal Del Rey 3. El Agostadero de San Juan de Carracitas 4. La Cardeneña

BALLI, ROSA MARIA HINOJOSA La Feria
Cameron, Hidalgo Counties at 53140, 919 acres respectively
Granted: 1777
Sub or Related Grants: Las Mesteñas, Pititas, La Abra

BARRERA, MANUEL La Tinaja De Lara
Jim Wells County at 25684 acres
Granted: 1836

BENAVIDES, JESUS El Pedernal
Zapata County at 9809 acres
Granted: 1848

BUSTAMANTE, PEDRO Las Comitas
Zapata County at 22142 acres
Granted: 1848

CABAZOS GUERRA, RAMON Santa Quinteria
Brooks, Kenedy Counties at 16140, 6000 acres respectively
Granted: 1833
Assignees: Gonzalez, Martha A, Devine, Joseph H. (1855)

CABAZOS, JOSE ANTONIO Santa Petronila
Nueces County at 28437 acres
Granted: 1834
Assignees: Lee, William H., Kelly, Ann J.

CABAZOS, JOSE NARCISO El Agostadero de San Juan de Carricitos
Willacy, Kenedy, Hidalgo Counties at 340967, 248690, 12000 acres respectively
Granted: 1792
Settlements/Towns: some detailed info on 220-54/55

CABAZOS, LINO La Blanca
Hidalgo County at 24060 acres
Granted: 1834
Sub or Related Grants: Sacatosa

CANALES SALINAS, JOSE ANTONIO Sacatosa
Starr County at 8856 acres
Granted: 1834

CANALES, JOSE MARIA El Socorro
Zapata County at 8856 acres
Granted: 1835

CHAPA, JOSE MANUEL, AND LUCIANO La Encantada
Brooks County at 39855 acres
Granted: 1832

CHAPA, LUCIANO El Encino del Pozo
Hidalgo, Starr Counties at 8856, 8856 acres respectively
Granted: 1832

CORDENTE, FRANCISCO Agostadero de la Santa Cruz de la Concepcion
Duval, Brooks Counties at 21621, 519 acres respectively
Granted: N/A/Spain

CUELLAR, JOSE La Huerta
Zapata County at 2756 acres
Granted: N/A/Mex

CUELLAR, JOSE ANTONIO Palo Blanquito
Duval County at 8856 acres
Granted: 1835
Assignees: Cuellar, Nepomuceno

CUELLAR, JOSEFA La Cabecera de Los Angeles
Webb County at 8856 acres
Granted: 1835

DAVILA, EDUARDO San Antonio de Miraflores
Zapata County at 22453 acres
Granted: N/A/Mex
Assignees: Cuellar, Fernando

DOMINGUEZ, MAXIMO Agostadero de los Toritos
Hidalgo County at 8856 acres
Granted: 1834

ELIZONDO, ANTONIO El Lucero
Brooks County at 13358 acres
Granted: 1835

ELIZONDO, DIONICO El Señor de la Carrera
Duval County at 10078 acres
Granted: 1835

ENRIQUEZ, RAFAEL Balconcitos
Webb County at N/A acres
Granted: 1812

FALCON, BLAS MARIA El Chiltipin, San Francisco
Kleberg, Nueces Counties at 19034, 7571 acres respectively
Granted: 1834
Assignees: Henrietta M. King, Anna Collins

FARIAS, ALEXANDRO San Jose
Hidalgo, Starr Counties at 13108, 4605 acres respectively
Granted: 1829
Assignees: Heirs of Pedro de La Garza

FARIAS, FRANCISCO Santa Cruz
Starr, Hidalgo Counties at 17658, 55 acres respectively
Granted: 1808
Assignees: Farias, Maximo

FARIAS, GREGORIO El Diezmero
Nueces County at 17704 acres
Granted: 1806

FARIAS, JULIAN San Ramon
Hidalgo County at 22602 acres
Granted: 1804

FARIAS, MANUEL Paso Ancho de Arriba
Jim Wells, Kleberg, Nueces Counties at 4229, 3492, 3349 acres respectively
Granted: 1836

FARIAS, MAXIMO Las Preseñas de Arriba
Jim Wells County at 8856 acres
Granted: 1831
Assignees: Haynes, John L. (1853), Frederick Belden (1853)

FARIAS, POLICARPO San Antonio del Alamo
Nueces County at 4428 acres
Granted: 1834
Assignees: Kidder, Mary

FERNANDEZ DE LA FUENTE, ANDRES Puentecitas, Santa Petronila
Nueces County at 17713 acres
Granted: 1809
Assignees: Maria de Los Angeles Garcia de Tarnava and other heirs of Constantina de Tarnava,

FERNANDEZ, BARTOLOME, EUGENIO Concepcion de Carricitos
Cameron County at 57269 acres
Granted: 1789
Assignees: Heirs of Both
Settlements/Towns: Brownsville, San Benito
NOTES: Approximately one half of this grant later passed to Col. Stephen Powers and his heirs. Col. Powers was responsible in securing this land for the Fernandez brothers after the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo was signed in 1848. The Fernandez’s tract followed the river bank, while the Powers tract was further back away from the Rio Grande. Powers later bought out some of the heirs of Fernandez and aquired quite a large piece of land along the river which became known as Rancho Cypress.

FLORES, JOSE MARIA Laguna Larga
Zapata County at 8856 acres
Granted: 1835

FLORES, JUAN El Javali
Starr, Jim Hogg, Zapata Counties at 12297, 2967, 2448 acres respectively
Granted: 1836
Assignees: Heirs

FLORES, JULIAN & VENTURA San Diego
Jim Wells, Duval Counties at 24825, 14855 acres respectively
Granted: 1831

FLORES, SANTOS Aqua Poquita
Duval County at 26745 acres
Granted: 1836

FLORES, SEGUNDO Los Guajes
Hidalgo, Starr Counties at 12419, 903 acres respectively
Granted: N/A/Mex
Assignees: Heirs

FLORES, YGNACIO El Agostadero del Panal
Starr County at 9854 acres
Granted: N/A/Mex
Assignees: Flores, Alejandro

FUENTES DE LA, VELENTIN Alberca de Arriba
Webb County at 22142 acres
Granted: 1835
Assignees: Peña De la , Tomasa and Heirs

FUENTES DE LA, VELENTIN San Casimiro
Webb County at 17713 acres
Granted: 1831

GALAN, JOAQUIN “One Porcion, Palafox”
Webb County at N/A acres
Granted: bef 1804
Assignees: Garza De la, Manuel

GALAN, JOAQUIN Balconcitos
Webb, Dimmitt Counties at 275, 139207 acres respectively
Granted: 1810

GALAN, JOAQUIN Palafox
Webb County at 66975 acres
Granted: bef 1804
Assignees: Garza De la, Manuel (1805)

GARCIA SALINAS, JOSE RAFAEL San Leandro
Duval, Jim Wells Counties at 11228, 6484 acres respectively
Granted: 1831

GARCIA SALINAS, RAFAEL La Mesteña, Gonzaleña
Brooks County at 22142 acres
Granted: 1835
Assignees: Garcia, Justo, Jose Maria

GARCIA Y GARZA, NICOLAS AND BRUNO Las Animas
Jim Hogg County at 66426 acres
Granted: N/A/Mex

GARCIA, ANASTACIO Charco Redondo
Zapata, Jim Hogg Counties at 20049, 2091 acres respectively
Granted: 1835
Assignees: Garcia, Guadalupe

GARCIA, ANDRES El Tanque
Zapata County at 17713 acres
Granted: 1831

GARCIA, ANDRES San Andres
Duval County at 23043 acres
Granted: 1836

GARCIA, ANTONIO El Tule
Brooks County at 10839 acres
Granted: 1836

GARCIA, BERNARDO El Infiernillo
Kleberg, Nueces Counties at 21471 acres respectively
Granted: 1834
Assignees: Henrietta M. King (1905)

GARCIA, JOSE MANUEL Porcion 11, Palafox
Webb County at 9286 acres
Granted: 1816
Assignees: Sheldon, Thomas, Milmo, Daniel

GARCIA, JOSE MARIA La Vaca
Jim Wells County at 22142 acres
Granted: 1836

GARCIA, MATIAS Palo Alto
Nueces County at 30998 acres
Granted: N/A/Mex
Assignees: Bouchard, Pedro

GARCIA, ONOFRE El Grullo
Zapata County at 17713 acres
Granted: 1848
Assignees: Haynes, John L. (1857), Swenson, S.M. and, Swisher, John M. (1857)

GARCIA, PEDRO El Perdido
Brooks, Hidalgo Counties at 10186, 7526 acres respectively
Granted: 1836

GARCIA, RAFAEL Agua Dulce
Nueces, Jim Wells Counties at 18801, 7330 acres respectively
Granted: 1834
Assignees: Garcia de Tarnava, Maria, Garcia de Mananton, Felipa

GARCIA, RAFAEL Santa Isabel
Cameron County at 32355 acres
Granted: 1828
Settlements/Towns: Port Isabel
NOTES: Rafael Garcia originally applied for this grant in 1827. It was surveyed in 1828 and concession granted in 1829. The TGLO records differ with this date. This grant was later inherited by Rafael Garcia’s widow Guadalupe Cisneros Garcia and his two daughters Maria Garcia de Tarnava and Felipa Garcia de Manatou. Land was in the public domain prior to Garcia aquiring it. 106-38

GARCIA, SANTOS El Charco de Palo Blanco
Duval County at 22142 acres
Granted: 1835
Assignees: 24 Leagues, (14) Ynojosa, Jose Marcelo, (5) Garcia, Santos, (5) Ynojosa, Diego

GARCIA, YSIDRO La Mesteñas
Brooks County at 22142 acres
Granted: 1835
Assignees: Garcia, Jose Maria

GARZA DE LA FALCON, JUAN JOSE San Francisco
Duval, Jim Wells Counties at 12654, 8067 acres respectively
Granted: 1831
Assignees: Laureano Falcon and Heirs

GARZA DE LA MONTEMAYOR, JUAN JOSE AND SONS: JOSE MANUEL, JOSE AGUSTIN, JOSE PERFECTO Casa Blanca
Nueces, Jim Wells Counties at 44042, 26806 acres respectively
Granted: 1807
NOTES: This site can trace it it’s beginnings to 1755 when Tomas Sanchez later founder of Laredo was the leader of the Villa de Vedoya which at that time was located adjacent to Mission Señora de la Sota (Lipantitlan). Sanchez then relocated the village to a point on the Piñetas Creek about one and a half miles from it’s entry into the Nueces. Apparently this village was also abandoned and Sanchez moved back to the Laredo site. In 1766 this site was resettled by a Jose de la Garza. In 1807 it was formally granted to Juan Jose de la Garza Montemayor, apparently an heir and soon after it became a port of entry for trade with Mexico. Background and info in 106-57/58

GARZA DE LA Y SOSA, MANUEL El Potrero de Buena Vista
Cameron County at 30217 acres
Granted: 1828
Assignees: Garza de La y Garza, Nestor

GARZA DE LA, ALVINO AND DOMINGO La Parra
Kenedy County at 66426 acres
Granted: 1833

GARZA DE LA, ANDRES San Andres de Las Comitas
Starr County at 13825 acres
Granted: 1832
Assignees: Bedinghaus, Frederick, Garza de La, Sabas (1849)

GARZA DE LA, APOLINARIO Las Preseñas
Jim Wells County at 11626 acres
Granted: 1831

GARZA DE LA, APOLINARIO Los Finados
Kenedy County at 51484 acres
Granted: 1833

GARZA DE LA, JOSE LORENZO, JOSE DOMINGO, AND JOSE JULIAN Las Preseñas
Kleberg, Jim Wells Counties at 59153, 19075 acres respectively
Granted: 1808

GARZA DE LA, JOSE SALVADOR El Agostadero del Espiritu Santo
Cameron County at 284415 acres
Granted: 1781
Assignees: Goseascochea de Tijerina, Feliciana, Garcia de Tarnava, Maria, Lafon, Ramon, Goseascochea, Estefana, Prieto, Manuel, Garcia Cabazos, R
Sub or Related Grants: Potrero de San Martin Santa Isabel El Rincon del Grullo
NOTES: This man was the Great Grandfather of Juan N. Cortina (id 1682), noted Mexican Military man and General. 106-77

GARZA DE LA, PEDRO Santa Rosa de Arriba
Kenedy County at 28784 acres
Granted: 1834
Assignees: Heirs

GARZA DIAZ, JUAN Vargas
Brooks, Hidalgo Counties at 17712, 7526 acres respectively
Granted: 1836

GARZA SAIS, RAFAEL Palitos Blancos
Jim Hogg County at 13472 acres
Granted: 1836

GARZA, DIONISIO Santo Domino de Abajo
Jim Hogg County at 17889 acres
Granted: 1831
Assignees: Ramirez, Antonio

GARZA, RAMON El Paisano, Los Olmos
Jim Wells, Kleberg, Brooks Counties at 6184, 3456, 1430 acres respectively
Granted: N/A/Mex

GARZA, TEODORO El Alazan
Kenedy County at 13532 acres
Granted: 1834
Assignees: Garza y Garza, Maria Antonia

GOMEZ, IRINEO Las Barrosas
Kenedy County at 24660 acres
Granted: 1833

GOMEZ, MANUEL Santa Anita
Hidalgo County at 95202 acres
Granted: 1800
Assignees: Dominguez, Sixto

GONZALEZ, ANTONIO Santo Tomas
Webb County at 53136 acres
Granted: 1801
Assignees: Gonzalez, Jose Maria

GONZALEZ, JOSE ANTONIO La Huerta
Duval County at 23781 acres
Granted: N/A/Spain

GONZALEZ, JOSE DOMINGO Las Pintas
Webb County at 18795 acres
Granted: 1809

GONZALEZ, VICTORIANO Las Cuevitas
Jim Hogg, Starr Counties at 14325, 3087 acres respectively
Granted: 1836
Assignees: Barrera, Santos, Gonzalez, Patricia

GRISANTI, NICOLAS Clark’s Island
Cameron County at 177 acres
Granted: 1833

GUERRA CHAPA, FRANCISCO Loma Blanca
Brooks County at 22142 acres
Granted: 1831

GUERRA, ANTONIO Three Porciones, Palafox
Webb County at 13953 acres
Granted: 1810

GUERRA, YSIDRO Palo Blanco
Brooks County at 17713 acres
Granted: 1831

GUERRA. JUAN JOSE El Tule, Charco Redondo
Brooks County at 22538 acres
Granted: 1835
Assignees: Guerra, Guadalupe

GUTERRIEZ, ANTONIO El Paradizo
Kleberg County at 13243 acres
Granted: 1835
Assignees: Henrietta M. King (1905)

GUTERRIEZ, MIGUEL Santa Gertrudis
Kleberg County at 11683 acres
Granted: 1835
Assignees: Gutierrez, Nicolas

GUTERRIEZ, YGNACIO Los Mogotes
Zapata County at 8856 acres
Granted: 1835

GUTERRIEZ, YSIDRO Los Ojuelos
Webb County at 8856 acres
Granted: 1830

HINOJOSA DE BALLI, JUAN JOSE Llano Grande
Hidalgo County at 127625 acres
Granted: 1790
Ranches: Toluca El Rosario Relampago 220-57
Settlements/Towns: Toluca – ProgresoWeslaco

LAREDO (TOWN TRACT) Ejidos de Laredo
Webb County at 8393 acres
Granted: 1767

LEAL DE LEON, JOSE ANTONIO San Antonio del Encinal
Kenedy, Brooks Counties at 13940, 13938 acres respectively
Granted: 1833

LEAL, BENIGNO Santa Ana
Hidalgo County at 9883 acres
Granted: 1834
Assignees: Basse, Elisha, Hord Robert H. (1850)

LOMBRANO, JUAN FRANCISCO Las Islitas
Dimmit, Maverick Counties at 26766, 5790 acres respectively
Granted: 1812
Assignees: Cassiano, Jose

LONGORIA GARZA DE LA, LEONARDO El Rincon del Grullo
Kleberg County at 28642 acres
Granted: 1848
Assignees: Lopez de Longoria, Juliana

LONGORIA, ANTONIO Los Sauces
Nueces, Jim Wells Counties at 11475, 6237 acres respectively
Granted: 1831
Assignees: Farias, Manuel

LOPEZ DE HERRERA, JOAQUIN, JOSE VICENTE, MARIANO El Diezmero
Nueces County at 18640 app, 3 entries acres
Granted: 1806
Assignees: Garcia Ramirez, Jesus

LOPEZ DE JAEN, BENITO San Antonio de Agua Dulce
Jim Wells, Nueces Counties at 6020, 3323 acres respectively
Granted: 1809
Assignees: Mann, William

LOPEZ, MARCELINO Las Preseñas
Jim Wells County at 16149 acres
Granted: 1831

M ONTALBO, FRANCISCO Las Viboritas, Santa Rita, Loma del Sordo
Jim Hogg County at 17713 acres
Granted: 1831

MARTINEZ ESTEVAN La Noria de Tio Ayala
Brooks County at 18756 acres
Granted: N/A

MARTINEZ GUTIERREZ, ANTONIO Blas Maria
Zapata County at 8856 acres
Granted: 1835

MENDIOLA, JUAN Rincon de Santa Gertrudis
Kleberg County at 15499 acres
Granted: 1832
Assignees: King, Richard (1868)

MORALES GARCIA, Jose Antonio and Apolinario, San Antonio
Brooks, Hidalgo, Starr Counties at 18756, 4248, 4808 acres respectively
Granted: 1835

MORALES, JOSE ANTONIO El Venadito
Starr, Hidalgo Counties at 12824, 9824 acres respectively
Granted: 1835
Assignees: Morales, Cristobal

MORENO, JUAN San Juan
Jim Wells, Duval Counties at 3444, 984 acres respectively
Granted: 1835

MORENO, SANTOS La Trinidad
Jim Wells County at 17157 acres
Granted: 1836

PEREDA, ANDRES BAUTISTA Charco de la India
Zapata County at 17713 acres
Granted: 1810

PEREDA, JOSE MANUEL Cerrito Blanco
Zapata County at 17712 acres
Granted: 1810

PEREZ REY, JOSE, JOSE MARIA AND GARCIA, JOSE MANUEL Rincon de los Laureles
Kleberg, Nueces Counties at 95179, 5669 acres respectively
Granted: 1807

PEÑA DE LA, FELIPE Las Animas, Alberca de Abajo
Jim Hogg, Webb Counties at 17712, 4428 acres respectively
Granted: 1835

PEÑA DE LA, RAFAEL Las Moritas
Jim Hogg County at 22140 acres
Granted: 1836
Assignees: Peña, Jesus and other Heirs

PEÑA DE LA, YGNACIO Los Olmos
Brooks, Duval, Jim Wells Counties at 12920, 4702, 4518 acres respectively
Granted: 1831

PEÑA DE LA, YGNACIO Los Olmos y Loma Blanca
Brooks, Jim Wells Counties at 24000, 20280 acres respectively
Granted: 1831
Assignees: Hinojosa, Rafael

PEÑA, ANTONIO Palo Blanco
Jim Hogg, Brooks Counties at 12687, 6251 acres respectively
Granted: N/A/Mex
Assignees: Peña, Trinidad and Francisco

PEÑA, FRANCISCO Palo Blanco
Jim Hogg, Duval Counties at 6817, 400 acres respectively
Granted: N/A/Mex

PEÑA, YGNACIO Los Magueyes de Palo Blanco
Brooks County at 16004 acres
Granted: 1831
Assignees: Hinojosa, Rafael

RAMIREZ, ANTONIO Los Jaboncillos
Jim Wells County at 25860 acres
Granted: 1835

RAMIREZ, JOSE MIGUEL Agua Nueva de Arriba
Jim Hogg County at 35427 acres
Granted: 1831
Assignees: Ramirez, Andres and Gervacio

RAMIREZ, JUAN MANUEL Agua Nueva de Abajo
Jim Hogg County at 44284 acres
Granted: bef 1836

RAMIREZ, MANUEL La Laguna de Los Venados
Zapata County at 8856 acres
Granted: N/A/Mex

RAMIREZ, RAFAEL Rincon del Peñascal
Kenedy County at 39390 acres
Granted: 1833

RAMIREZ, RAFAEL San Pedro del Charco Redondo
Duvall, Brooks Counties at 21530, 22140 acres respectively
Granted: 1808

RAMIREZ, RAFAEL Santa Rosalia
Duval County at 22584 acres
Granted: 1808

REYNOSA Los Ejidos de Reynosa
Hidalgo County at 10124 acres
Granted: 1767
Assignees: State of Texas

RIVAS, ANTONIO Rivas Grant
Maverick, Webb, Dimmitt Counties at 123000, 1535, 1300 acres respectively
Granted: 1765
Assignees: Heirs

RIVAS, LUCIANO El Paso de Abajo
Nueces, Kleberg Counties at 9030, 2040 acres respectively
Granted: 1836
Assignees: Grogan, James, Haynes, John L. (1857)

RIVAS, YGNACIO La Blanca
Brooks, Starr, Jim Hogg Counties at 9508, 2606, 1240 acres respectively
Granted: 1834
Assignees: Dowd, Peter

RIVAS, YGNACIO San Rafael
Jim Hogg County at 8856 acres
Granted: 1830
Assignees: Rezendez, Nepomuceno, Felipe

RIVAS, YGNACIO San Rafael
Jim Hogg County at 13871 acres
Granted: 1830
Assignees: Heirs of Maximo Villarreal

SAIS, JUAN JOSE Los Retaches
Starr County at 13285 acres
Granted: 1832
Assignees: Haynes, John L.

SAIS, VICENTE La Sal Colorada
Starr, JimHogg Counties at 14006, 3883 acres respectively
Granted: 1836
Assignees: Sais, Gregorio

SALINAS, JAVIER San Pedro de Las Motas
Kenedy County at 22140 acres
Granted: 1833
Assignees: Salinas, Arcadio

SALINAS, JOSE LUIS San Antonio de Baluarte
Jim Hogg, Brooks Counties at 15940, 6200 acres respectively
Granted: 1830
Assignees: Salinas, Manuel

SALINAS, LEONARDO La Barreta
Kenedy County at 22140 acres
Granted: 1834
Assignees: Lopez de Seuzeneasu, Ygnacia, Garcia, Gertrudis

SALINAS, NICOLASA Los Magueyes
Hidalgo, Starr Counties at 10967, 1293 acres respectively
Granted: N/A/Mex
Assignees: Salinas, Francisco

SANCHEZ, GUADALUPE La Rucia
Brooks, Hidalgo Counties at 12732, 9408 acres respectively
Granted: 1835
Assignees: Elizondo, Lucas

SILVA, ANTONIO La Noria de Santo Domingo
Jim Hogg County at 22140 acres
Granted: 1831
Assignees: Silva, Andres

TREVIÑO, ANDRES Las Comitas
Kleberg County at 1834 acres
Granted: 1834
Assignees: Ramirez de Treviño, Eustaquia, Henrietta M. King (1905)

TREVIÑO, GABRIEL Rincon de la Boveda
Kleberg County at 28784 acres
Granted: 1834
Assignees: Ramirez Elizondo, Manuel

TREVIÑO, JOSE YGNACIO Potrero de San Martin
Cameron County at 27289 acres
Granted: 1827
Assignees: Treviño, Manuel

VARGAS, LEONARDO Guadalupe del Encinal
Brooks County at 13285 acres
Granted: 1834
Assignees: Olivares, Juan

VAZQUEZ BORREGO, JOSE Hacienda De Dolores
Zapata, Webb Counties at 166532, 109818 acres respectively
Granted: 1767

VELA CUELLAR, SANTIAGO El Peyote
Zapata County at 17713 acres
Granted: 1835

VELA, GREGORIO Santa Teresa
Starr, Jim Hogg Counties at 7527, 1329 acres respectively
Granted: N/A/Mex
Assignees: Garza, Estevan

VELA, JAVIER San Antonio Viejo
Jim Hogg County at 17713 acres
Granted: 1805
Assignees: Peña, Jesus and other Heirs

VELA, LUIS Agostadero del Sordo
Jim Hogg County at 25229 acres
Granted: 1848

VELA, TRINIDAD Santa Maria de los Angeles de Abajo, El Mesquite
Duval County at 22142 acres
Granted: 1835

VILLARREAL, ENRIQUE Rincon del Oso
Nueces County at 42840 acres
Granted: 1831
Assignees: Kinney, Henry L.
Settlements/Towns: Corpus Christi

VILLARREAL, PEDRO San Pedro de Carricitos
Cameron County at 12730 acres
Granted: 1833
Assignees: Heirs of, Garcia, Matias, Villarreal, Jose Maria, Cabazos, Miguel

VILLARREAL, PEDRO Santa Rosa de Abajo
Kenedy County at 6400 acres
Granted: 1832

VILLARREAL, YGNACIO Rincon de Mirasoles
Kenedy County at 22837 acres
Granted: 1833

YNOJOSA DE, MIGUEL El Palmito, San Pedro
Kenedy County at 22140 acres
Granted: 1833

YNOJOSA DE, RAMON El Rincon de Corpus Cristi
Nueces County at 81407 acres
Granted: 1832
Assignees: Schatzell, John Peter
Settlements/Towns: Corpus Christi

YNOJOSA DE, SIMON Las Noriacitas
Jim Hogg County at 22142 acres
Granted: 1835
Assignees: Benavides, Jose Maria

YNOJOSA DE, VICENTE El Rincon de Alazan
Kleberg County at 29374 acres
Granted: 1834
Assignees: Heirs, Henrietta M. King (1905)

YNOJOSA DE, VICENTE Las Mesteñas, Pititas, La Abra
Hidalgo, Willacy, Cameron Counties at 92976, 22695, 30998 acres respectively
Granted: 1798
Assignees: Garza de La, Leandro and Heirs
Sub or Related Grants: La Feria
NOTES: This grant, consisting of 35 leagues was granted in 1794. Vicente Hinojosa later transferred the southern twelve leagues to his sister Rosa Maria Hinojosa de Balli, which became known as the Ojo de Agua tract. Out of this tract came another grant by the name of La Feria which in 1790 was granted to Capitan Jose Maria Balli Guerra, Rosa Maria’s husband.

YNOJOSA VITAL La Anima Sola
Jim Wells, Duval Counties at 18534, 1475 acres respectively
Granted: 1836

YNOJOSA, DIEGO San Rafael de los Encinos
Duval, Jim Hogg Counties at 27372, 14700 acres respectively
Granted: 1835

YNOJOSA, JOSE ANTONIO Los Sauces
Kleberg County at 28007 acres
Granted: 1834
Assignees: Henrietta M. King (1905)

YNOJOSA, JOSE MARCELO Palo Blanco
Duval, Jim Hogg, Brooks Counties at 43548, 14500, 3944 acres respectively
Granted: 1835

YNOJOSA, VICENTE Las Anacuas
Duval, Jim Wells Counties at 13766, 2260 acres respectively
Granted: 1836
Assignees: Garcia y Ynojosa, Jesus and Heirs

YSAGUIRRE, ANTONIO Santo Domingo de Arriba
Jim Hogg County at 18018 acres
Granted: 1831
Assignees: Heirs

ZAPATA, ANTONIO Villa
Zapata County at 22142 acres
Granted: 1848
Assignees: Heirs

ZARATE DE BAYARENA, PILAR La Alameda
Brooks County at 13132 acres
Granted: 1835
Assignees: Heirs

ZARATE, GIL La Blanca
Brooks, Hidalgo Counties at 19306, 2834 acres respectively
Granted: 1835

Source: http://vsalgs.org/

GOP Hopefuls Eyeing the Texas Hispanic Vote but Rick Perry probably won’t be getting much of the 26 Million Hispanic Votes!

GOP Hopefuls Eyeing the Texas Hispanic Vote but Rick Perry probably won’t be getting much of the 26 Million Hispanic Votes

Rand Paul, Ted Cruz, Rick Perry, Jeb Bush

AP –  The last Texas Republican to occupy the Oval Office, George W. Bush, took 49 percent of the state’s Hispanic vote in his 2004 presidential re-election, setting a relatively high bar for the handful of Texas-born or -raised Republicans who might be hoping to follow in his footsteps in 2016.

Republican presidential aspirants with ties to the Lone Star State must figure out how to hold the GOP base and attract conservative Hispanics if they want to be successful in Texas, political observers say.

So how do the party’s four most prominent Texas affiliated might-be candidates — former Gov. Rick Perry; Jeb Bush, the son and brother of two former presidents from the state; Texas’ junior U.S. senator, Ted Cruz; and U.S. Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky — stack up in the early going?

For Republicans to avoid a repeat of 2012, when presidential nominee Mitt Romney took only 27 percent of the Hispanic vote nationwide, they need to nominate a conservative candidate who can go into Hispanic communities and truly connect with voters, said Hector De Leon, co-chairman of the website." href="http://www.artexas.org/">Associated Republicans of Texas, which reaches out to Hispanic voters.

“It’s all about paying attention,” De Leon said.

Hispanics made up 10 percent of the national electorate in the 2012 presidential election. But in Texas, they make up almost one-third of eligible voters. And there’s plenty room for improvement when it comes to voter turnout. Only 39 percent of Texas Hispanics eligible to vote cast ballots in 2012.

Political observers say candidates would be right to take a page out of George W. Bush’s playbook on Hispanic outreach. He solidified his winning record with Hispanics with help from Latino-media guru Lionel Sosa, who told The Texas Tribune he has been in talks with Jeb Bush about his possible presidential bid.

Sosa helped George W. Bush’s campaign craft several television ads that painted him as the candidate who understood Hispanic culture. The candidate who can mobilize on-the-fence Hispanic voters who usually do not turn out to vote could win the state.

“I do think the primaries will include a concerted effort by some candidates to speak to that constituency,” said Sylvia Manzano, a senior analyst for the nonpartisan political polling organization Latino Decisions. “In Texas, that’s 10 million people. That’s a number that cannot be ignored.”

Though it’s still early in the game, many political observers say Jeb Bush is best positioned at the moment. He grew up in Midland, spent much of his childhood in Houston and is considered friendly to the Hispanic community, both personally and politically.

“Jeb Bush is not going to come in and play mariachi politics,” Manzano said. “He knows better than that.”

But this far out, all is speculation. As the candidates tiptoe toward the starting gate, here’s how several political experts handicap the field.

JEB BUSH 

Already holding a political advantage because he is fluent in Spanish, the former Florida governor has experience winning over Hispanics in a state where they make up a large part of the population. During his 1998 re-election campaign, Bush won an impressive 61 percent of Florida’s Hispanic electorate. It’s worth noting, though, that Florida’s mostly Cuban Hispanic population differs from Texas, where a majority of Hispanics have roots in Mexico.

What the experts say:

For Bush, reaching out to Texas Hispanics would be an extended family affair. Aside from benefiting from the groundwork his family has done in the state, expect to see Bush campaigning with his Mexican-born wife, Columba, and his son, Texas Land Commissioner George P. Bush, at his side. George P. is also fluent in Spanish and helped found Hispanic Republicans of Texas, a political group that recruits and supports Hispanic Republicans running for public office.

Bush’s record on issues that resonate with Texas Hispanics, particularly immigration reform, could prove attractive to this voting group. He has urged Congress to pass immigration reform and has highlighted it as a key issue in helping Republicans win Hispanics. He also gained national attention last year when he said many of those entering the country illegally do so out of an “act of love” for their families.

RICK PERRY

As the state’s longest-serving governor, Perry has long courted Texas Hispanics. He has steadily improved his standing since winning only 13 percent of the Hispanic vote when he defeated Hispanic businessman Tony Sanchez of Laredo in 2002. By the time he was re-elected in 2010, Perry pulled in 38 percent of Hispanic voters.

What the experts say:

Perry’s efforts to broaden his appeal were buoyed by the passage of the Texas Dream Act during his 14-year tenure. Though the future of the law granting in-state tuition to some undocumented immigrants is unclear, Perry has stood by it both on the national stage and at home. During a 2011 presidential debate, Perry famously told opponents who challenged his support of the law that they had no heart. More recently, as the state’s new GOP leadership works to overturn the law, Perry has been vocal about his continued support for it.

Because he presided over the state’s economic boom in the last decade, Perry has a unique opportunity to appeal to Hispanics on economic issues. If Perry can convince Hispanic voters that they benefited from the so-called Texas Miracle, he may be able to sway some on-the-fence voters his way. However, Perry for years is suspected been paid off by the big oil industries and is allegedly under investigation from the FBI for this corruption, and has other Federal charges pending, which he has spent taxpayers money on, and campaign donations. He also has been accused of spending billions of the Hispanic Land Grant descendants money and misappropriated it.  Depending on how the outcome of these charges come out, this could be detrimental for his support of the 26 Million Hispanic Voters.

TED CRUZ

Though he is the only Hispanic in the group — and the first Hispanic senator from Texas — Cruz has largely avoided making heritage part of his political persona beyond recounting his father’s journey to the United States from Cuban as an exile in 1957. Still, he has done well with Texas Hispanics. In 2012, he outperformed Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney, taking 35 percent of the Hispanic vote, according to a Latino Decisions poll.

What the experts say:

Cruz arguably faces the toughest challenge courting Texas Hispanics given his divisive tone on immigration and health care. He has been vocal in his opposition to President Obama’s executive order on immigration, which will grant millions of undocumented immigrants work permits and reprieve from deportation proceedings. The order is widely popular among Hispanics. On health care, Cruz has been one of the biggest foes of the federal Affordable Care Act. Texas Hispanics — who make up a large portion of the state’s uninsured population — overwhelmingly support the health law.

RAND PAUL

Though Paul was elected to the Senate from Kentucky, where Hispanics make up only 3 percent of the population, he grew up in Lake Jackson, Texas, where Hispanics are one-fifth of the population. Paul has spent the last few months preaching a message of Hispanic inclusion within the Republican ranks.

What the experts say:

Paul is someone to watch in the upcoming election when it comes to appealing to Texas Hispanics because of his views on growing the GOP’s number of Hispanic supporters. Because he is largely unknown among Texas Hispanics, Paul also has some room to improve his standing. A November 2014 poll by Latino Decisions found that almost a third of Texas Latino voters have no opinion of Paul.

RAZA UNIDA PARTY – HISPANIC ACTIVIST SERIES

This is the first of a  series on Hispanic / Latino activists.  We hope this will inspire many to remain active, or to unify, and especially get involved more in our network.

TEXAS –

RAZA UNIDA PARTY. The Raza Unida Party was established on January 17, 1970, at a meeting of 300 Mexican Americans at Campestre Hall in Crystal City, Texas. José Ángel Gutiérrez and Mario Compean, who had helped found MAYO (the Mexican American Youth Organizationqv) in 1967, were two of its principal organizers. In December 1969, at the first and only national MAYO meeting, Chicano activists had endorsed the formation of a third party, an idea that Gutiérrez had proposed in establishing MAYO. After RUP filed for party status in Zavala, La Salle, and Dimmit counties in January 1970, it began its eight-year quest to bring greater economic, social, and political self-determination to Mexican Americans in the state, especially in South Texas, where they held little or no power in many local or county jurisdictions although they were often in the majority. Membership in the party was open to anyone who was committed to RUP’s goals. The party fielded candidates for nonpartisan city council and school board races the following April in Crystal City, Cotulla, and Carrizo Springs and won a total of fifteen seats, including two city council majorities, two school board majorities, and two mayoralties. In October 1971, RUP held its state convention in San Antonio and voted to organize at the state level over the objections of Gutiérrez, who believed that the party should strengthen its rural standing rather than expend its energy on a state party. Compean rallied enough support for a state organization on the grounds that it would give a boost to the Chicano movement in Texas and repeat the success it had attained in Crystal City throughout Texas.

With the state party apparatus in place, RUP sought a candidate for the 1972 gubernatorial election, first calling upon such well-known Democrats as state senator Carlos Truán, Hector García (founder of the American G.I. Forumqv), and state senator Joe Bernal. All refused to run for the position. The party finally found a candidate in Ramsey Muñiz, a lawyer and administrator with the Waco Model Cities Program. Alma Canales of Edinburg, who had been a farmworker and journalism student at Pan American University, became the RUP candidate for lieutenant governor, although at twenty-four she was too young to take the office constitutionally. Her presence on the RUP slate was considered a sign that women had a crucial role in the party. Although they seemed an unusual match, the two resembled many of the RUP rank and file, who were young and university educated. Like others in the party, they had also been members of MAYO. Besides Muñiz and Canales, RUP ran candidates for nine other state offices, including member of the Railroad Commission, state treasurer, and member of the State Board of Education. RUP candidates also ran for local posts in Hidalgo, Starr, Victoria, McLennan, and other counties.

The party, which had spread to many other states, held its first national conference in El Paso on September 1–4, 1972. About half of the estimated 1,500 participants were women, and a large number of elderly people also attended. The delegates formed the Congreso de Aztlán to run the national party and elected Gutiérrez as RUP national chairman. Despite his standing as the party’s chief political candidate, Muñiz was not much heeded. As a result, he left the gathering early to campaign in the governor’s race. The RUP platform that Muñiz put before voters, while emphasizing Mexican-American community control, bilingual education, and women’s and workers’ rights, bore similarity to the values espoused by the liberal faction of the state Democratic party, which supported Frances (Sissy) Farenthold for the party’s gubernatorial nomination. In spite of this, Muñiz did not receive strong support from liberals. Ultimately, even Farenthold endorsed Dolph Briscoe, to whom she had lost the nomination, although she had once referred to him as “a bowl of pablum.” Muñiz won 6 percent (214,149) of the votes in the November election, thus reducing Briscoe’s margin of victory so that the race was the first in the twentieth century in which a Texas governor was elected with less than a majority. Muñiz won heavily in some South Texas counties and had a decent turnout in large cities. Over the next two years RUP solidified its South Texas rural base and racked up more nonpartisan victories in the Winter Garden Region. It also achieved political successes in Kyle and Lockhart. Its urban support, though quite strong among university activists and barrio youth and politicians, remained small. This ultimately hurt the party’s future, since many Hispanics lived in the state’s major urban areas and their support of RUP was necessary for the party to have a larger political impact.

In 1974, RUP was ready for another try at the governor’s race, with Muñiz once again its candidate. The party also ran a slate of fourteen men and two women for state representative from Lubbock, Houston, San Antonio, Austin, Falfurrias, Crystal City, and other cities. As in the 1972 election, the RUP campaign literature emphasized the party’s Chicano foundation; but it also asserted a desire to “ensure democracy for [the] many, not the few” and the need to preserve “human and natural resources.” In addition, it called for the prosecution of industrial polluters. In his announcement for the governor’s race on January 16, 1974, Muñiz sought to maximize the party’s appeal to a broader spectrum of the state’s voters, stressing RUP’s ideas for new modes of transportation, improved funding of public education, better medical care, and solutions to urban problems. But RUP did not fare well in the 1974 general election. Muñiz got only 190,000 votes and posed no real threat to Briscoe’s reelection. In addition, none of the sixteen candidates for the state House garnered enough support to win. The party’s sole real victories were in Crystal City, where cofounder Gutiérrez was elected as Zavala county judge and the party successfully defended its dominance of other county offices. Nonetheless, by its numerous victories in South Texas, RUP had achieved Mexican-American political dominance in some cities and altered the state’s political life. Several Mexican-American women were significant participants at the state and national level. Evey Chapa, for instance, ensured that RUP’s state executive committee provide for a female member; Virginia Múzquiz headed the RUP nationally from 1972 to 1974; and María Elena Martínez served as the last head of the party in Texas from 1976 to 1978. Likewise, Evey Chapa, Ino Alvárez, and Martha Cotera have been credited with organizing Mujeres Por La Raza, the women’s caucus within RUP.

In the four years after the 1974 election, RUP’s fortunes diminished, with activism slowing except in some enclaves in South Texas. Even in Crystal City, its bedrock, RUP lost control in 1977. The party also suffered losses in its membership, and some of its original leaders, including Willie Velásquezqv, allied themselves with new political initiatives, such as the Mexican American Democrats. Perhaps two of the biggest blows to party morale were the arrests in July and November 1976 of former RUP gubernatorial candidate Ramsey Muñiz on drug charges. He pled guilty to one count and was sentenced to fifteen years. The party was considerably weakened as it entered the final and fatal 1978 election, when RUP gubernatorial candidate Mario Compean won only 15,000 votes. At the election-day fiasco in 1978, RUP lost state funds for its primary and was effectively eliminated as a party. Some historians have stated that RUP, with its various successes and failures, came at the right moment in Mexican-American history in the state. Writing in 1978 in The Tejano Yearbook: 1519–1978, Philip Ortega y Gasca and Arnoldo De León noted that the establishment of RUP in the 1930s would have been “premature” because violence was still a common response to Texas Mexicans’ political ambitions. Nevertheless, the authors also argue that RUP was neither a new phenomenon nor a “radical” one but a continuation of Tejano political initiatives. Nineteenth-century Tejanos had formed various movements, such as Botas and Guaraches and special benevolent associations, to defend their interests. RUP was intended to do the same for Mexican Americans in the 1970s.

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

Ignacio M. Garcia, United We Win: The Rise and Fall of La Raza Unida Party (Tucson: University of Arizona Mexican American Studies Research Center, 1989). José Ángel Gutiérrez Papers, Benson Latin American Collection, University of Texas at Austin. Raza Unida Party Collection, Benson Latin American Collection, University of Texas at Austin.

Source: http://www.tshaonline.org/

 

 

Hispanic / Latino Activists

We are beginning a series on Hispanic / Latino activists.  We hope this will inspire many to remain active, or to unify, and especially get involved more in our network.

History teaches us that there are more followers than leaders, yet each person born has the capacity to lead, people still tend to look at strong people who will take the lead and rise up for their rights. In the Hispanic / Latino population, there are many more leaders and people who rise up to stand for what they believe in.

In this series we will focus on activists around the nation who made a difference in our history and people who today are leading the way in Hispanic / Latino rights.  We will cover topics from Land grants, to other issues.

We will study in depth people like  Reies López Tijerina and other activists.  If you have a story, please submit it click here.

 

01/24/2015 Comments are off the Voice of Change
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Land grant activist, Chicano civil rights leader leaves complex legacy

Tijerina, 88, died Monday in El Paso, his adopted home since 2006. His family attributed his death to natural causes.

Those most closely associated with his status often acknowledged his health had been failing in recent years.

Ironically, Tijerina died on Martin Luther King Day, the day the nation honors another civil rights leader.

Not long after news of his death splashed on digital media across the United States, Tijerina’s fans quickly praised him — a South Texas Pentecostal minister — as “a valiant fighter for truth and justice.”

Some scholars insist that even before death Tijerina already was an important warrior in the Chicano movement for civil rights, on equal footing with leaders like farm worker organizer Cesar Chavez in California, political activist Rodolfo “Corky” Gonzales in Colorado and Jose Angel Gutierrez, co-founder of La Raza Unida Party in Texas.

Tijerina shoved once obscure land grant issues in New Mexico into the national and international spotlights.

He led the Alianza, a citizens organization in New Mexico, that sought to repossess old Spanish and Mexican land grants in the Southwest.

The group contended Mexicans and American Indian heirs were wrongfully deprived of their land by the federal government and others.

READ MORE ON THIS STORY CLICK HERE

You can also read more articles  here and here

We have some leaders like Tijerina in our movement, but we have the power of unity.  We will win, we will prevail.

 

Clearing up some confusion, Robert Gonzalez from South Texas has nothing to do with this network – and we are trying to working together with Mrs. Fowler

There seems to be some confusion still, when people visit this site, want to get involved, and have heard rumors.  We have talked about this together as a team of founders and decided the best thing to do is be open about this.

First of all, the Robert Gonzalez from South Texas ,the one that has slandered and defamed Mrs. Fowler publicly, has nothing to do, and never has done anything with this network, and will never be allowed into network, he is banned as long as he continues to destroy unity between the heirs. He probably does not even know about this network.  We support Mrs. Fowler  100% and pray for her every day.

There is not one shred of truth that this Robert was a part of this network, we solemnly swear  that the evidence that we give, is the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth, so help us God. Robert has never been part of this network, and never will be.

Someone started some  about the site around Jan 7th, through Facebook comments on another persons page, the post that had much misunderstandings in it, but now the post is removed.  There is much confusion and disunity between some of the Spanish Land Grant Heirs still to this day since that post.  Robert Gonzalez from South Texas has never had anything to do with this network, this was found by some heirs, and other Hispanic descendants who are active people and support our efforts, in fact we have a team of people that work for the AP who are volunteering their time, resources, legal insight and more.

We posted a post about some mis-understandings, a few weeks ago, which should of cleared some things up, but there are always new visitors, and people who have heard about this network, and when they talk among people who heard the rumor, they are not so inclined to unify and are still confused.  This definitely is stifling our in  many ways.  We want to clear this confusion and the lies right now.

After some mis-undertandings were cleared up, Attorney Eileen M Fowler requested that we list her as an Attorney on this website, also has requested us to post information about her heirs group.  You have seen our posts concerning these requests if you keep up with our news.  She has requested that anyone wanting to donate to litigation to please donate to her HEIRS membership group, the information is in our group section.   If you want to donate to our active causes for example, petitions, elections, demonstrations, activism then donate here on this network.  

There is stuff we have not mentioned because Mrs. Fowler has asked us to limit some information because of some of the big things going on with Morganroth and Morganroth, and we always continue to honor her with this request.

She has asked our network to help urge unity to the descendants, and suggest fund raising venues, and other activism.  She is looking into some of our suggestions for fundraisers, and we will keep you posted.

We have been working together with Mrs. Fowler

since Jan 12th, and as a part of this cooperation, we frequently ask her permission to post many of our news articles, as we want to make sure that we are interfering with any of the legal professionals, and we are certainly not legal professionals, although we have a few on our team. When we began this network we were not connected with her, but with other people who were supporting our cause. At some point in the future, slowly but surely she will let people know we are trying to work together, because we all want unity. 

So now that we have this confusion cleared up, it will be up to you to trust, after all we are not doing anything negative here, as you can see all of our efforts are positive in achieving the same common goals.   We have members that already know about what we just made public, and they are behind us 100%, we hope you will lay aside differences, rumors, things that have no truth to them at all, and unify together with the growing numbers.

We hope for the new members or those members that are wavering a little, will pray for us, and begin to unify with our efforts. We can not do this alone we need all of the heirs unified together to make a change.

Please if you have any questions or concerns, please contact us.

01/23/2015 Comments are off the Voice of Change
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Our new subscription campaign, and some tricks for everyday readers

In our campaign to increase the information getting out to people we created a subscribe box.  If you have not subscribe by email, this is a great tool to never miss any of the latest news, laws, tips, group and network updates, current and future activism causes, events and more.

This box will present you with a pop up and the trick for everyday readers is to

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look at the bottom of the pop-up box and click never see this message again, so you can continue browsing.

This also has links to social share and also like our other social networks.

The power of sharing and commenting

Many of you have a Facebook account, and when you like a post that is a good thing, when you share a post that is all together better, because it spreads the information into your networks of people.  Sharing from our website is a very powerful tool for this network and our causes.  In fact if you don’t have a google or twitter account, we encourage you to sign up from free. If you have other social networks, like Linked in, Tumblr, this is even better. This will help boost the education, boost the traffic to our cause, clear up confusion, and help our network and causes grow. Thanks

Here is how to share:

1) You do not have to be logged into our network to social share.

2) You will need to be logged into the social network you are sharing too.

3) At the top of bottom of posts are different types of social share buttons:  See examples below

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4) Click on a multiple share buttons and share away.

5) Go a head and comment from your social network, our network picks up Facebook and Twitter comments

6) To comment from the network you must be a member, or you must log in,  click the login at the top left corner of the page, you can use different social networks to log in, although you won’t be a registered member until you sign up for the PRO Membership, but clicking Join in the top left corner of the page.

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Supporter’s Submission

#wewillnotbesilent

This is a new form for elections primarily.  If you are sending out letters or making phone calls to find out who supports the Spanish Land Grant Heirs we want to publish a list.  As you receive the response back, please get their name, email address, phone number and position (office) they are running for an office, or (elected) office  they are currently serving, or other.

You may also use this to submit other people that support our cause, professionals, attorneys, celebrities so that we can reach out to them.

If it has already decided, why are we here? Shapiro – Nov 2014 HB724 Commission Testimony

As HB724 commission deny their responsibilities, to support and recommend solutions for the Texas Spanish land grant heirs. Shapiro asks the really tough question s why are we here, if it has already been decided? According the pre-scripted commission report, they had already decided back in the first couple of meetings what the outcome would be.
We were unable to transcribe this word for word, but we have paraphrased the video a little bit to give you some highlights..

Her Grandmother told her how the Spanish came and given rights, and then taken from us. Watched her with hope in her eyes that someday it will be righted.

She talked about Indian reservations rights were taken from them, but then they were granted lands, free laws, no taxes, casinos, but you see us from land grants from the crown of Spain, prior to anyone else coming over, we have no lands, no free education, no free healthcare, her we stand with families in poverty, suffered in hardship, no where to turn with hope in their eyes…

(as you watch the commission, their faces turn red and you can see them boiling over in anger, some of this comes from the two previous testimonies, watch as they take offense)

She met the current land owner of one of her families lands, and the man allegedly said he wanted to let you know, it has already be decided, he pulls out his phone with photos of him with the Bush family, and the current speaker of the house Joe Straus*…

one of the commission member says “you think everyone on this commission is being ruled by those people.. I resent that… ”

Shapiro says “I did not say that,” the man Mr. Bennie Bock, an attorney for the oil companies, says “that is the implication” and he continues stating that he can’t fix the wrongs, the commission has a specific duty, to contact the comptroller, and that if she wants a change in that, go to the legislature

(Is Mr .Bock blind? He can’t understand his own mandate that he is there to help fix the wrongs and recommend rights, but he tries and fails to convince everyone that this is not their job)

Shapiro again restates what she stated, about the Bush family and the current speaker of the house, not any of the commission members, yet they take offense. And apologized this is fact she says.

Shapiro states facts, then she says that if it has already been decided then why are we here? …. There should be a solution to this issue that has been going on for over 200 years.

Brunn fires back and says what he interprets is the commissions duty, (yet in his report, he states otherwise and that no one gave any proofs, out of all the testimony and submitted documents, he dismisses the proof). He also joins Bennie’s recommendation about going back to legislature.

He also takes offense, so Shapiro fires back, rightly so, and says what she said is on public record, recorded and witnessed that she did not accuse the commission. This really angers some of the commission members.

Shapiro makes some excellent recommendations about the State having all the tools, including a local database for geneologies, and she talks about the current system inability to trace people because of a name change.

This is one of three testimonies this day that you must see.

 

*Joe Straus was elected to the 79th Legislature on February 5, 2005. Served in the George H.W. Bush administration as deputy director of Business Liaison at the U.S. Department of Commerce, 1989-1991. Elected Speaker of the House, January 13, 2009, January 11, 2011 and January 8, 2013

Downloads sections have been fixed

#wewillnotbesilent Public and Member downloads are fixed.

Commission reports, submissions, PR, Marketing, Elections, Laws etc …

Now all public downloads are located in our shop, click here  and also available in various postings.  If you run into a post that has a bad link to a download, just head to the store and download there.

Member downloads are also fixed, we had permission problems but it is solved for members.  Click here for member downloads.

 

Tips for staying active & stress free with a busy schedule

#wewillnotbesilent #onevoiceunited  We all know the life of a hectic schedule.  Today we want to give you some tips to help you relieve stress, stay project focused and remain active.

1. Create a music playlist

Some people focus by shutting out distractions. Do you have an iPod around or MP3 player, or a smartphone? This is one way you can disconnect and enjoy, while others use this tool to help them focus on a task.

2. Step away from the desk

Let’s admit it, sometimes it is easy to become a workaholic at work or on a task. So step away.  Sometimes our best ideas come in the shower, or when we don’t have so much to focus on.  Clearing your mind for a while and getting back to the task helps both relieve stress, and re-energizes your projects.

3. Looking ahead

Add to the planning, the daily task, and also the future tasks.  Sometimes we get focused on day to day things and lose sight of the tasks that will also matter the most. We must work a little on both each day, short term and long term goals.

4. Disconnect

Our smartphones can be the worst distraction. So turn it of, and disconnect, then use time texting, for other projects.

5. Use a task management tool

We use Trello as one of our task managers as a lot of businesses do. It is a whiteboard, task manager online and on your smart device. It helps you keep focused.  Also use a notepad like Google keep  to jot down simple reminders like sticky notes.

6. Get concentrated

There are some app like concentrate (for Mac) or  Google chrome extension stay focused  to limit distractions during your computer work.

7. Tackle less

When you tackle to many things, like getting up, making breakfast for everyone, doing this and that, getting to work, going to the game, to the party, to the dinner, you start to rob yourself of energy and creativity and it leads to mediocre performance.

8. Don’t do it all yourself

The power of a network, family, friends is that you don’t have to do it all yourself.  Even if you are single and live alone there are some simple things you can do to offload tasks that weigh you down.  For example, if your single, using a laundry service, can take a huge load off your time. Asking for help for things that you really don’t have time for or help so you don’t have to do the project all alone.

9. Share

Sharing your excitement with others, talking about a project really is refreshing and motivating. Take a coffee break and do some sharing.

10. Exercise

Walking, bicycling, jogging or working out are big stress relievers.  It also gets your brain working.

 

Ways you can help the network:

1) Check out our causes, like our petition, membership campaign, unity campaign, election campaign

2) Get others involved, but also take on a project yourself.

3) Spend 30 minutes a day, a a couple hours a week doing something to promote this network and work on causes / goals

4) Share, talk, tweet about us.

 

The more focused and stress free we become and the more we get involved the more we grow and the more number power we have to put political pressure on the State or new legislation to help our cause.

 

Introducing our Shop

We are having problems with our Digital Downloads software, so we are moving slowly all Downloads to our shop  http://thevoiceofchange.info/shop/

If you downloaded any of our downloads paid or free that contained more than one download link, and you did not get all the downloads, please email us. If it was  free download, then you can check back at our shop and re-download them from there.

We put the most important download in our shop, our flyers which are free.

Also please note there is a difference in Downloads, if you are a member some of the downloads are free, so check under Members –> members downloads for the free content that is normally paid.

We hope to keep the site self-maintained, maybe someday we will be able to hire some support people.

Multiplying Power

Don’t forget this great tool as we grow any campaign. We call it #multiplyingpower   #wewillnotbesilent #onevoiceunited #westandunited

1 person encourage 6 people to join you have 6 people .

When those 6 people get 6 people you have 36.

When we repeat this 8 times we have 1.6 million united people,  9 times and we have over 10 million.

If one person only get’s three people, this is not to difficult either, we have half those numbers.   Let’s grow strong and unite.

Our goal is uniting our causes and growing our network together for the same common purpose.

 

01/13/2015 Comments are off the Voice of Change
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HEIRS

 

Attorney Eileen McKenzie Fowler (www.spanishlandgrants.com) or (www.eileenmckenziefowler.com) has asked we publish her website HEIRS group information here.  http://www.eileenmckenziefowler.com/heirs/     

Funds raised from descendants must be made payable to HEIRS, LLC, P. O. Box 490, La Porte, TX 77572, so that litigation costs can be offset. Litigation funds are managed by Attorney Eileen M. Fowler who has asked us to publish this info. Here expertise is listed in our Attorney reference section.

 

Seeking Restitution from Corruption John D. Falcon Speech HB724 Dec 19, 2014

This is another of the famous speeches during the HB724 commission meeting where everyone cheered.  We have obtained the script here and the video below.  #wewillnotbesilent #westandunited #thevoiceofchange #onevoiceunited #josejrsierra

Download the entire script –>

Download

http://youtu.be/NFAX5DhH8_Q

Two Countries one Lie by Jose Jr Sierra

This is one of the famous speeches during the HB724 commission meeting where everyone cheered.  We have obtained the script here and the video below.  #wewillnotbesilent #westandunited #thevoiceofchange #onevoiceunited #josejrsierra

 

DOWNLOAD ENTIRE FILE

Hundreds of thousands gather for injustice, someday we will have the same numbers

AP

Right now hundreds of thousands are gathering in Paris to protest as a solidarity march, the evil attack that happened this weekend.  Security is very high, but the unity, all chanting in one voice is amazing.  Someday we will have hundreds of thousands in this network, joining for the causes that effect our injustices.

This did not take long for people to gather, these evil extremest groups awakened the giants in the French people, just as the evil injustices of Texas and other injustices in the United States, have awakened the Hispanic Latino population.

Someday we will march hundreds of thousands strong in red shirts, saying

#wewillnotbesilent #westandunited #thevoiceofchange #onevoiceunited

 

Photo:  credit source AP

#wewillnotbesilent #westandunited #thevoiceofchange #onevoiceunited

Our new hashtag campaign, #wewillnotbesilent #westandunited #thevoiceofchange #onevoiceunited We want the State of Texas to release our royalties & stop spending them you can use this hashtag in twitter and facbook and google plus, http://thevoiceofchange.info/portfolio/sign-petition-state-texas-release-royalties-bonuses/

copy and repaste this post let’s make it viral

From now on, all of our posts will have these hashtags   #wewillnotbesilent #westandunited #thevoiceofchange #onevoiceunited

On this day in 1901, a drilling derrick near Beaumont, Texas The Start of the US Oil Industry

On this day in 1901, a drilling derrick near Beaumont, Texas, produces an enormous gusher of crude oil, signaling the start of the US oil industry.

 

On this day in 1901, a drilling derrick at Spindletop Hill near Beaumont, Texas, produces an enormous gusher of crude oil, coating the landscape for hundreds of feet and signaling the advent of the American oil industry. The geyser was discovered at a depth of over 1,000 feet, flowed at an initial rate of approximately 100,000 barrels a day and took nine days to cap. Following the discovery, petroleum, which until that time had been used in the U.S. primarily as a lubricant and in kerosene for lamps, would become the main fuel source for new inventions such as cars and airplanes; coal-powered forms of transportation including ships and trains would also convert to the liquid fuel.

Crude oil, which became the world’s first trillion-dollar industry, is a natural mix of hundreds of different hydrocarbon compounds trapped in underground rock. The hydrocarbons were formed millions of years ago when tiny aquatic plants and animals died and settled on the bottoms of ancient waterways, creating a thick layer of organic material. Sediment later covered this material, putting heat and pressure on it and transforming it into the petroleum that comes out of the ground today.

In the early 1890s, Texas businessman and amateur geologist Patillo Higgins became convinced there was a large pool of oil under a salt-dome formation south of Beaumont. He and several partners established the Gladys City Oil, Gas and Manufacturing Company and made several unsuccessful drilling attempts before Higgins left the company. In 1899, Higgins leased a tract of land at Spindletop to mining engineer Anthony Lucas. The Lucas gusher blew on January 10, 1901, and ushered in the liquid fuel age. Unfortunately for Higgins, he’d lost his ownership stake by that point.

Beaumont became a “black gold” boomtown, its population tripling in three months. The town filled up with oil workers, investors, merchants and con men (leading some people to dub it “Swindletop”). Within a year, there were more than 285 actives wells at Spindletop and an estimated 500 oil and land companies operating in the area, including some that are major players today: Humble (now Exxon), the Texas Company (Texaco) and Magnolia Petroleum Company (Mobil).

Spindletop experienced a second boom starting in the mid-1920s when more oil was discovered at deeper depths. In the 1950s, Spindletop was mined for sulphur. Today, only a few oil wells still operate in the area.

HB 724 Oct 2014 Meeting Audio

Here is the audio for the Oct. 2014 Meeting for your download.  As you know the video / audio was is not available on the Texas Website, but we have obtained it for you.

The small download fee is for our download server cost. 

DOWNLOAD ENTIRE FILE

Also we lowered the cost of the commission report to download. CLICK HERE

28 Million Latino Voters in 2015

AP –

A record 25.2 million Latinos were eligible to vote in the 2014 midterm elections, making up, for the first time, 11% of all eligible voters nationwide. But despite a growing national presence, in many states with close Senate and gubernatorial races this year, Latinos make up a smaller share of eligible voters, according to an analysis of Census Bureau data by the Pew Research Center.

In the eight states with close Senate races, just 4.7% of eligible voters on average are Latinos. Among those states, Latinos make up less than 5% of eligible voters in six. in the eight states with close Senate races, just 4.7% of eligible voters on average are Latinos. Among those states, Latinos make up less than 5% of eligible voters in six.

In Texas that number is 4.2 Million Registered Hispanic voters, 44% of Latinos are eligible to vote. Texas has the second largest Hispanic population in the nation.   California ranks first with 5.9 million

In each midterm election since 1974, the number of Latino voters reached a new record high, largely reflecting the community’s fast population growth. However, the share of those Latinos who actually vote on Election Day—the voter turnout rate—has lagged significantly behind other racial and ethnic groups.

For Hispanics, however, young people are a larger share of eligible voters than they are among other groups. Texas’s 16th district is the largest Congressional district by Latino eligible voter population, with 313,000 Latino eligible voters.

So not only do we need to energize people to send out letters, we need to energize Latinos this year to register to vote, and show up at the polls on election dates.

We did a search on our site for voters, you can also search elections, and get involved, there are many ways presented.  Also use our causes and events for more information about Elections and what you can do to make an impact in 2015.  We have started early, lets keep this going. Thanks for all your help.